Investors in residential house flipping have made a big come back the last few years. Much of the popularity of this can be attributed to the many TV shows dedicated to renovation, repair, investment and flipping. I’ve written on this topic before (see post HERE). However, I did not focus on the other side of the transaction, the end buyer. There is risk that buyers of this type of property should be aware of and look for. These issues were prevalent in the foreclosure crisis and the bursting of the housing bubble in 2008-10. This is not to say that investors haven’t learned their lesson. But, some people are dishonest and greedy. Pay attention to these 6 potential risks.

  1. Financing – yours and your seller’s. Make sure that you are solely responsible for selecting your lender, completing your loan application and providing the lender with all requested documentation. The foreclosure crisis was caused, in part, by unscrupulous investors who falsified buyers’ loan applications without buyers’ knowledge, thus committing mortgage fraud. Also, look at the seller’s existing mortgage. This will show on your title commitment/report. Is it in the same name as the entity selling you the property? Is there only one mortgage? Is the mortgage for less than the purchase price? Any of these can be indicators of an earlier fraud. If you are paying cash, get an appraisal to assure that you aren’t over paying.
  2. Title – Review the title commitment carefully. Make sure that the seller owns the property. Look at the 24-month chain of title. Has there been an unusual amount of conveyances prior to the conveyance to the seller? Has the seller made other conveyances prior to your closing? Have all prior mortgages been satisfied? Do not allow the seller or the seller’s title company handling the title for you to close without allowing you AND your attorney to review before closing.
  3. Seasoning – Some Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and FHA loans prohibit the sale of a property for a period of time (60-180 days) following the date of the mortgage. This would be in the seller’s existing mortgage. Make sure that all such provisions have expired.
  4. Redemption Rights – if seller purchased the property at foreclosure, make sure prior owners’ right of redemption has expired. In Florida, the right of redemption expires on sale, so if a certificate of title has been issued, there is no right of redemption.
  5. Permitting – make sure that all improvements made by the seller have been properly permitted and all permits have been properly closed and certificates of occupancy issued. This holds true for improvements made by prior owners.
  6. Other Issues Regarding Improvements – Inspect, inspect, inspect. Make sure all of seller’s improvements and repairs have been properly made. Although this goes with number 5 above, just because the work has been permitted and a certificate of occupancy issued (hopefully), you should assure the quality of the work. Warranties should be assigned and where possible, get warranties from the seller.

 

If all house flippers were like the ones on TV, none of this would be necessary and every house bought from a flipper would look like a celebrity’s mansion. But that is not the case. There are many good, even great flippers. But there are many poor and dishonest ones as well. Beware.

There was a time, not so long ago, when a high percentage of the residential closings that we were doing were short sales. Short sales really ramped up following the bursting of the housing bubble and then peaked during the foreclosure crisis.  We all know how we got there and we remember the no doc, no review teaser loans.  Short sales were a fact of life.  We represented both buyers and sellers in short sales.  In both cases, we were at the mercy of the lenders in addressing the ridiculous number of requirements for approvals and then waiting for months on end for the approvals to come back.

Fortunately, those days are behind us. Short sales are rare, but not completely gone.  So, if you are selling you’re house, how do you know if a short sale is right for you and what will a short sale mean for you?  I haven’t thought much about these questions for a while, but like most of my blog posts, I am inspired to write about this now because recently, a new client inquired about short sales.  The client was transferred from South Florida to Atlanta, leaving behind a house with an outstanding mortgage balance (combined 1st and second) of over $800,000.  The house is not yet listed for sale, though the client has already relocated.  The agent expects that the house will sell for under $700,000.  The client wanted to know what to do and what will happen.  His first question was whether we should apply for short sale approval with the lenders now.

The answer is no. Obviously, if the agent is correct, there will be a short sale.  However, until a contract is signed, there is no approval to obtain from the lenders because we don’t know the amount of the deficiency.  And, because there are 2 lenders, the contract might be enough to satisfy the 1st mortgage leaving the 2nd unpaid.  If the 1st insists upon full payment, the dynamics of the negotiations would change completely.

In addition, in order to approve a short sale, lenders require an appraisal of the property. The appraisal must be by an approved appraiser and can’t be too old.  So, we couldn’t submit an appraisal yet.  The appraisal might be stale by the time a contract is signed.

Another factor is the client’s ability to pay the deficiency. If the client is liquid or has net worth or otherwise has income, lenders are less willing to write off the deficiency.  Where 2 lenders are involved, the client has a bigger hurdle, especially if the 1st mortgagee takes all of the sales proceeds.  Attempting to obtain pre-contract approval would bring attention to these issues far too early in the process.

At this point, I suggested to the client that it would be a bad idea to have any conversation with either lender until there was a contract in place. Once a contract has been signed, it should be submitted to each lender for approval and a case made for the short sale.  Here, the arguments have to be made that the client is unable to pay the deficiency.  I explained that lenders are supposed to make this decision on a primarily objective basis, but we can give subjective reasons for an economic hardship.  But, since we are not in the crisis mode any more, it is now difficult to predict how lenders will lenders will react and that the client needs to be prepared to address the deficiency.

Short sales can’t be counted on as escape routes for home owners or as a simple alternative to the foreclosure process any more. Lenders are less willing to write off deficiencies without a compelling economic hardship.  Because there isn’t a back log of short sales to approve, lenders will carefully review every request for short sale.  If you have other options, you should consider them as well.

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        Commercial Real Estate lending continues to explode. Through the third quarter of 2015, CRE loans outstanding totaled over $1.8 trillion.  Over the last 8 years or so, CRE underwriting standards have eased somewhat.  The Federal Reserve, FDIC and Comptroller of the Currency issued a Joint Statement at the end of 2015 warning about this problem.

“The agencies have observed substantial growth in many CRE asset and lending markets and increased competitive pressures are contributing significantly to historically low capitalization rates and rising property values. At the same time, other indicators of CRE market conditions…do not currently indicate weaknesses in the quality of CRE portfolios…. [T]he agencies have also observed certain risk management practices at some institutions cause concern, including a greater number of underwriting policy exceptions and insufficient monitoring of market conditions to assess the risks associated with these conditions.”

        The statement directs financial institutions to reinforce prudent risk management practices and to maintain discipline in CRE lending. Examiners will be closely watching lending practices in the future.

        Lenders have not yet reacted to the statement nor announced plans to change underwriting standards or practices or whether they will scale back CRE lending as a direct result of the statement. But, the question becomes ‘do the agencies see the current CRE conditions as similar to the conditions that lead to the housing bubble and crash of the late 2000’s?’  There, housing values continued to increase, to the point that they were artificially high.  Good underwriting practices were totally ignored and, the combination of the 2 in addition to teaser loans, led to mass loan defaults. Yes, I am purposefully leaving out the CMBS aspect of the bubble, but, from the bank/consumer side, the agencies’ statement of concerns sounds very similar.

        For now, we need to take the statement as a warning – not just to be careful in our CRE lending and borrowing practices. But that the good times in commercial real estate will not last forever.  We know that they never do.  Developers, investors and lenders can hedge against another devastating crash by not growing complacent and succumbing to short cuts as everyone did with the housing crisis.  With good due diligence and smart practice, the next “crash” will only serve as a “market correction”.

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