Last week, the House of Representatives passed, and the President signed, The Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (S.2155). The Act rolls back several provisions of The Dodd-Frank Act, the law that was enacted to regulate banks following the financial crisis to help assure that tax payers would not have to bail out banks again. With the economy continuing to strengthen, smaller banks have argued that the tight regulations imposed by Dodd-Frank have made it difficult to compete. Wall Street concurs and argues that loosening restrictions would generate growth in underserved areas allowing community banks and credit unions to free up capital to lend to smaller borrowers who might not otherwise qualify for loans from larger banks.

The Act removes stress test requirements for banks with assets of less than $250 billion. This provision alone should help consumers in rural areas because credit will free up for community banks and credit unions according to Redfin chief economist Nela Richardson. Lawrence Yin, NAR chief economist expects that there will be a rise in regional construction because small, local home builders will be more likely to obtain construction loans from community banks.

The Act is getting praise across the board from the real estate industry. But there is concern that the Act opens the door to the old practices that brought about the crises in 2008. The “Volcker Rule”, which prohibits financial firms from investing proprietary funds, was eliminated for banks with less than $10 billion in assets. This could cause banks to lose federally insured money on risky investments. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are now required to consider alternative credit scoring models. This could open the door to loans to borrowers who don’t have the ability to repay loans. Small banks are exempt from certain disclosure requirements. Redfin’s Richardson says that this could lead to racial inequality in lending.

The result of the Act is that only the 10 biggest banks in the country remain subject to full federal oversight. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) says “it’s a bad bill under the guise of helping community banks”. Pelosi said that the Act will take us back to the pre-meltdown days.

The biggest critic of the Act and the biggest advocate of banking reform, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) said the bill would “bail out big banks again” and would increase the likelihood of taxpayer bailouts. Senator Warren argued that the Act exempts 2 dozen financial firms with assets from $50 billion to $250 billion from the strictest rules imposed by Dodd-Frank. These banks received billions of dollars in bailouts and should not have oversight relaxed says Senator Warren.  Although she supports helping community banks, Senator Warren believes the Act goes way too far.

However, the Congressional Budget Office report says that the relaxation of the regulations creates a “slightly greater risk” of another crash and bailout”. Currently, CBO says, we are at only a “small risk”. Barney Frank, one of the authors of Dodd-Frank says that there is “nothing” in the legislation that damages the regulations intended to curb risk taking by large banks. Those regulations were not weakened for the largest banks. While Frank believes the $50 billion threshold is too low and the $250 billion threshold is too high, the overall risk of harm caused by the new Act is low.

It might be too early to understand the overall effects of the new Act, but it appears that more money will be infused into real estate. If the Act is not the fore runner to further loosening of Dodd-Frank restrictions which allow reckless practices, then the Act could be a good thing. However, if it is used as a crack that Wall Street uses to burst through to fully de-regulate and return banks to the days of the Wild West, we need to be vigilant.

I recently came across a blog by Camile Baptiste titled 3 Advantages of Buying Bank Owned Property (REO) (see Camile’s Blog HERE). I tweeted it out and said that it is totally false (follow me @dkblattneratty).  Maybe it isn’t totally false, but there are numerous reasons not to buy REO property.  Banks, as sellers, are extremely difficult to deal with.  Let me briefly enumerate my observations.

  1. Banks typically attach a multi-page addendum to the standard from contract used in a locale. The addendum, of course, disclaims any liability for anything that could possibly be wrong with the property. OK, “AS IS” is “AS IS”.  But the addendum changes customary contract provisions including times for inspections, responsibility for closing costs and rights regarding title.

 

The title issue can be a big one. In most areas in Florida, the buyer selects the title agent.  Banks, following foreclosure, like to control title.  In a recent REO transaction I handled for a buyer, the bank’s title company provided the title commitment and set the closing date.  However, the title commitment showed that the foreclosure was not complete and a subordinate lender was not properly foreclosed.  Therefore, the property had to be re-foreclosed.  Because we couldn’t control the process, it was difficult to first convince the title company and then the bank that re-foreclosure was required.  They wanted us to close!  Then, we had no ability to coordinate with the bank to assure that the case was progressing and the re-foreclosure took over 18 months.

  1. Banks don’t negotiate – anything. Their form is their form.  The deal is the deal.  If there is a problem later, they don’t negotiate.  During the same transaction, while waiting for the re-foreclosure, Hurricane Irma hit South Florida.  Though the contract was “AS-IS”, it also provided that seller shall maintain the property and deliver it in the same condition as of the Effective Date.  Additionally, there was a casualty/risk of loss paragraph.  Hurricanes were covered under this paragraph and seller had an obligation to spend up to 1.5% of the purchase price to repair damages, including removal of debris and trimming of trees following a casualty.  Of course, there was extensive damage and the purchase price was just under $1,000,000.  The bank did almost no clean up or repair.  The roof was severely damaged and had extensive leaks, yet the bank didn’t even put a tarp on the roof to stop the growing water and mold damage to the interior.  The pool pump became inoperable creating a green cest-pool.  A horse stable on the property was demolished and not cleared or re-built.  Fences were missing and trees uprooted.  Notwithstanding, the bank only agreed to a closing credit of only $10,000.

 

  1. Banks don’t close or make decisions as quickly as advertised. When a contract is submitted or a decision is required, the real estate agent will tell a buyer that the bank will respond immediately.  That is never the case as approval is not obtained locally.  An out of town asset manager makes the decision.  The asset manager has dozens of files on his/her desk and responds when he/she can, regardless of contractual deadline.  If buyer’s lender requires information or a signature, the asset manager doesn’t move any more quickly.  There is no “professional courtesy” afforded from the selling bank to the new lender.

 

  1. REO property is always in worse condition than advertised or than you observe. The foreclosed owner didn’t care for it and in fact, purposefully damaged it on the way out.  Bank will do the absolute minimum to maintain it while it owns it and will do nothing to repair it.  They hire local property managers or real estate agents to do these things and the local managers/agents spend as little as possible to maximize their profits under their contracts.

 

  1. Anti-flip provisions in REO sale contracts limit buyers. A large percentage of buyers of REO properties are flippers.  Many REO sale contracts restrict the buyer’s ability to flip.  These restrictions range from 60-180 days.

 

  1. Banks and asset managers are usually located out of state and therefore, unfamiliar with local law and custom. This causes additional delay and confusion.

These are but a few of the difficulties in buying REO property. Though the price is often attractive, these and other difficulties can cause a buyer time, money and lost opportunities which might offset the favorable up front pricing.  Think more than once before buying from an REO.

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        As Florida gears up for a vote on Amendment 2, the Medical Marijuana Amendment, the United States Senate may be getting ready to consider a proposal by Senator Jeff Merkley D, OR) and Senator Patty Murray (D, WA) that would stop regulators from prohibiting, penalizing or discouraging banks from doing business with legal marijuana businesses. The senators, whose states have legalized recreational marijuana, have offered an amendment to an appropriations bill. The Senate Appropriations Committee has passed the amendment, 16-14. The amendment has yet to be attached to a specific bill and faces numerous hurdles. However, if ultimately passed, legal marijuana growers and dispensers should be able to deposit their cash in banks without fear of having their accounts frozen or seized.

             The legal cannabis industry has become a cash business as the federal government has refused to recognize it. Consequently banking laws are vague and legal marijuana growers are often treated like drug cartels by the federal government, giving the government access to bank accounts. The result is that growers and dispensers often sit on cash, a dangerous practice and bad for the economy.

             If the proposed amendment passes and if Amendment 2 passes, Florida will enter a new world. Medical marijuana growers and dispensers would be able to establish bank accounts and accept credit cards. Dispensaries would therefore become much safer places for customers and employers.

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